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John Locke Quotes

John Locke QuotesAll mankind... being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty or possessions.

Idea is the object of thinking.

The end of law is not to abolish or restrain, but to preserve and enlarge freedom. For in all the states of created beings, capable of laws, where there is no law there is no freedom.

The only fence against the world is a thorough knowledge of it.

To love truth for truth's sake is the principal part of human perfection in this world, and the seed-plot of all other virtues.

New opinions are always suspected, and usually opposed, without any other reason but because they are not already common.

I have always thought the actions of men the best interpreters of their thoughts.

For it is to be Remembred, That no Man borrows Money, or pays Use, out of mere Pleasure...

He that uses his words loosely and unsteadily will either not be minded or not understood.

But there is only one thing which gathers people into seditious commotion, and that is oppression.

Virtue is harder to be got than knowledge of the world; and, if lost in a young man, is seldom recovered

The state of nature has a law of nature to govern it, which obliges every one: and reason, which is that law, teaches all mankind, who will but consult it, that being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty, or possessions.

A sound mind in a sound body, is a short but full description of a happy state in this world.

It is one thing to show a man that he is in error, and another to put him in possession of the truth.

Preference of vice to virtue, a manifest wrong judgment. Good and evil, reward and punishment, are the only motives to a rational creature: these are the spur and reins whereby all mankind are set on work, and guided.

No man's knowledge here can go beyond his experience.

The only fence against the world is a thorough knowledge of it, into which a young gentleman should be enter'd by degrees, as he can bear it; and the earlier the better, so he be in safe and skillful hands to guide him

There cannot any one moral Rule be propos'd, whereof a Man may not justly demand a Reason.

All men are liable to error; and most men are, in many points, by passion or interest, under temptation to it.

John Locke Philosophy
George Berkeley
David Hume

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